Saturday, September 20, 2014

Connecting the Dots on Enterovirus EV-D68 Spreading Among Our Children

Excerpt - By Jeannie DeAngelis, AMERICAN THINKER:
It just so happens that Latin America is home to a fairly long list of scary infectious diseases.  So logic tells us that if people harboring communicable diseases are brought into our midst there’s a good chance those contagions will be passed along to us.

But, if scientific evidence is required, some additional research seems to provide that evidence, because as it turns out my theory that the Enterovirus came to America from Latin America (mainly Central America) is supported by a medical study conducted in 2013 at a U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit in Lima, Peru.  The study, published in Virology Journal, was entitled “Human rhinoviruses and enteroviruses in influenza-like illness in Latin America.”

Although Enterovirus EV-D68 had not surfaced here in America in 40 years, the research team concluded that:
In Latin America as in other regions, [Human rhinovirus] HRVs and [Human Enterovirus] HEVs account for a substantial proportion of respiratory viruses identified in young people with ILI [influenza-like illness], a finding that provides additional support for the development of pharmaceuticals and vaccines targeting these pathogens.
In other words, as of 2013, one year prior to the Obama administration encouraging and facilitating an influx of children from Latin America (primarily Central America) across the border, the U.S. government was well aware that when these children arrived they would be carrying with them a pathogen that accounts for a “substantial proportion of respiratory viruses identified in young people” living in Latin America, as well as a whole host of other viral maladies.

Interestingly enough, while pediatric Enteroviral infections are most commonly spread through a fecal-to-oral route, they can also be transmitted via “respiratory and oral-to-oral route,” which is “more likely to occur in crowded living conditions.”  Unfortunately for those not yet afflicted, “Enteroviruses are quite resilient... remain viable at room temperature …[have an]… incubation period [of] usually 3-10 days… and can survive the acidic pH of the human GI tract.”

That means if little Humberto, who has not yet learned the ins and outs of post-potty hand-washing, shares a doorknob with a kid from Kansas, depending on the practices of the facility, that doorknob could retain the capacity to infect healthy children for the next 3-10 days.


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